Acacia Offering Bowls

$120.00

They’re all slightly different than shown due to wood grain.

Acacia wood is both highly durable and water-resistant – ideal for heavy-use items that are in frequent contact with liquids. It is claimed that even if acacia wood isn’t treated or protected in any way, it can last up to 40 years. It is deep brown in colour with an attractive natural grain, giving a warm, rich touch to any home. Acacia’s durability means it isn’t scratched easily, too, while its water-resistant properties means it won’t warp readily and is highly resistant to fungus. Like many types of wood, acacia is naturally antibacterial, and is therefore safe to use for preparing or serving food.

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Description

4″ diameter

They’re all slightly different than shown due to wood grain.

Acacia Wood
Acacia wood is both highly durable and water-resistant – ideal for heavy-use items that are in frequent contact with liquids. It is claimed that even if acacia wood isn’t treated or protected in any way, it can last up to 40 years. It is deep brown in colour with an attractive natural grain, giving a warm, rich touch to any home. Acacia’s durability means it isn’t scratched easily, too, while its water-resistant properties means it won’t warp readily and is highly resistant to fungus. Like many types of wood, acacia is naturally antibacterial, and is therefore safe to use for preparing or serving food.

Offering Bowls tradition
At the time of the Buddha in ancient India, it was the custom of the day for devoted Buddhist households to make offerings to the Buddha and his monks and nuns as they traveled.  Typically they would be offered clean water for drinking and bathing, flowers, incense, light or a lamp, perfume or fragrance and music.  These offerings eventually became known as the 8 Auspicious Offerings and symbolize the coming forth of the Buddha’s precious teachings into the world.  These same offerings are still used today on Tibetan Buddhist altars as a way to express gratitude and respect for the Buddha.

Typically on a Tibetan Buddhist Altar there are seven offering bowls and one light.  They are arranged on the altar in a straight line close together.  The distance between each bowl is about the width of a grain of rice.  The water bowls are filled left to right and filled full but not overflowing.  The water is poured evenly and steadily with smooth, regular movement.  If the offering is poured in the correct way then it is said that beneficial outcome occurs and obscurations are dispelled. The closing of the altar is done in reverse, from right to left.

Additional information

Dimensions 4 in

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